Running Red Lights by Aleathia Drehmer

Running Red Lights by Aleathia Drehmer

Running Red Lights by Aleathia Drehmer

We often go through life…running red lights…and missing the interesting moments of the human condition. These are those moments captured by the poetic voice of Aleathia Drehmer.

In Running Red Lights, Aleathia Drehmer takes us on a slow walk through the broken and the ugly moments that are usually shut out or ignored by most of us. It is through her observations, her refusal to run red lights, her own past and now her poetry that gives them a bit of beauty. It is in these sacred moments the healing begins. —Scot Young, All Around Cowboy (Spartan Press)

 

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Aleathia Drehmer

Aleathia Drehmer

 

Aleathia Drehmer is the editor and creator of Durable Goods. She was once the editor of In Between Altered States, co-editor of Full of Crow and Zygote in My Coffee. Her work has been published in print and online since 2006. Her most recent poems can be seen in Rusty Truck, Roadside Raven Review, Spillwords, Red Fez, Piker Press, and Rasputin. Aleathia has upcoming work in Mollyhouse. Her most recent full-length collection of poems, Looking for Wild Things, is available on Impspired. Gutter Snob Books has just released her latest work, a chapbook of poems–Running Red Lights, now available. When Aleathia isn’t drowning in hospital work, you can find her by the river looking for poems. You can visit her author page at www.aleathiadrehmer.com

Aleathia Drehmer’s new chapbook, Running Red Lights, is a visceral pleasure. Wonderfully written, devilishly crafted, Drehmer will take you on an adventure, one you will not regret. —Jack Henry, Driving w/crazy (Punk Hostage Press)

 

Pretty verse; gritty, strong subjects that stain the edges of each poem of darker things inlaid. Hints of sexual indiscretions, morbid curiosity, and the uneasiness of other people seem to be common in the underlier. I related to “Faces of Old Men” and “The Recipe” for personal reasons. In “Invisible Hatreds” seems like a counterpoint of “A Woman is Not a Potted Plant” due to generational bias. In fact, the old ways are presented as rough and outdated. There’s a sense of hope and sadness, powerlessness and empowerment with the same subject. Mangoes, for instance, remind her of bad times, but for others, the smell of mangoes gives them hope.
—Ari Whipple, Full of Now (Alien Buddha Press)

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